A SchoolHouse for Everyone

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Gratitude

Laura Grill
November 17, 2020

It’s hard to believe that Thanksgiving is a week away. Time seems to move faster the older I get! For those living in the northeast, this year has brought the most beautiful fall foliage and spectacular weather so it feels like it could be the end of October (although this morning there was frost). I’m grateful for the added opportunities to take walks outside. I’m grateful for my community, and I am excited about the Turkey Trot that I’m organizing for our little area. (There is an inflatable Turkey!)

Many SchoolHouse pods spent this month focusing on gratitude. One pod started a gratitude jar, another made an anchor chart listing things that they are grateful for, and I am sure there are more instances, and more to come as the holiday approaches. The word gratitude is derived from the Latin word gratia, which means grace, graciousness, or gratefulness (needed to insert some academic learning!). Gratitude is a thankful appreciation, whether tangible or intangible. May we all be graceful while showing gratitude!

Gratitude is a way for people to stop and be happily satisfied with what they have, instead of reaching for something newer or shinier (social media doesn’t help with this!).

Positive psychology research shows that those who consistently are able to show gratitude report higher levels of happiness.

Gratitude helps us better experience positive emotions, celebrate good experiences, deal with adversity, and build strong relationships. (We love the endorphins that exercise gives as well- but if you show more gratitude there is no need to get sweaty, and it takes no time at all!).

The act of writing a thank-you note means a lot for an adult author. Truth be told, it does not have the same effect on the child; nevertheless, it’s important to teach children the act of showing gratitude through letters of thanks. These thank you notes have a large effect on the receiver of the note (not to mention it’s another excuse to practice writing!).

So, here is the lesson and key takeaway: Model being grateful for your children. Tell them why you appreciate them. Explain the ways that they make you laugh. Describe how they warm your heart. Delight in them. Even if they are driving you crazy- cherish them. They love you to the moon and back. While I know you feel this way about them, make sure they know it. Give them an extra hug and kiss - you don’t need to social-distance from them ;)

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Gratitude

Laura Grill
|
Nov 17
|
5 min read

It’s hard to believe that Thanksgiving is a week away. Time seems to move faster the older I get! For those living in the northeast, this year has brought the most beautiful fall foliage and spectacular weather so it feels like it could be the end of October (although this morning there was frost). I’m grateful for the added opportunities to take walks outside. I’m grateful for my community, and I am excited about the Turkey Trot that I’m organizing for our little area. (There is an inflatable Turkey!)

Many SchoolHouse pods spent this month focusing on gratitude. One pod started a gratitude jar, another made an anchor chart listing things that they are grateful for, and I am sure there are more instances, and more to come as the holiday approaches. The word gratitude is derived from the Latin word gratia, which means grace, graciousness, or gratefulness (needed to insert some academic learning!). Gratitude is a thankful appreciation, whether tangible or intangible. May we all be graceful while showing gratitude!

Gratitude is a way for people to stop and be happily satisfied with what they have, instead of reaching for something newer or shinier (social media doesn’t help with this!).

Positive psychology research shows that those who consistently are able to show gratitude report higher levels of happiness.

Gratitude helps us better experience positive emotions, celebrate good experiences, deal with adversity, and build strong relationships. (We love the endorphins that exercise gives as well- but if you show more gratitude there is no need to get sweaty, and it takes no time at all!).

The act of writing a thank-you note means a lot for an adult author. Truth be told, it does not have the same effect on the child; nevertheless, it’s important to teach children the act of showing gratitude through letters of thanks. These thank you notes have a large effect on the receiver of the note (not to mention it’s another excuse to practice writing!).

So, here is the lesson and key takeaway: Model being grateful for your children. Tell them why you appreciate them. Explain the ways that they make you laugh. Describe how they warm your heart. Delight in them. Even if they are driving you crazy- cherish them. They love you to the moon and back. While I know you feel this way about them, make sure they know it. Give them an extra hug and kiss - you don’t need to social-distance from them ;)

August 17, 2020

Introducing SchoolHouse

Take a moment and think back to the best educational experience you’ve had.

Chances are you’re thinking of a teacher. Maybe it was a teacher whose passion for a subject activated your own, or maybe they helped you see that you weren’t “bad” at something, you just needed an explanation that fit the way you learn.

The teacher is largely responsible for the educational outcomes of the class, yet our current educational structure tends to burn teachers out. In the U.S., 44% of teachers quit the profession in the first 5 years. I understand this because I’m one of them…

Read More
|
20 min read